Please Enjoy This List Of Words The Royal Family Aren't Allowed To Say

2 min read

We’re Not Sure How They Communicate…

When we think of the royal family we think of stockings, corgis and Anne Hathaway putting too much cold ice cream in her mouth while at a posh dinner in The Princess Diaries. 

Basically, we think of all things posh. 

But when you build a life on being clean-cut, upper-class leaders, there isn't much room for ‘dirty’ lower-class vocabulary. 

Terms like “bin chook”, “servo” and “shoey” and “mortgage” are big no-nos. Probably because they’ve never seen a mortgage in their life, but you get us; as a royal, there’s a lot of things you’re not allowed to say or do. 

Turns out there’s an actual LIST of words that the royal family are not allowed to say. If you ask us, they may as well become mutes because how they survive without some of these is beyond us. 

Where’s the “toilet?”

HOW DOES ONE GET THROUGH LIFE WITHOUT ASKING THIS QUESTION???

Okay, technically they CAN ask where the facilities are but they need to use the word “loo”. According to the Mirror, “toilet” is not used by the royals as it is derived from a French word  (which apparently makes it improper??? Beats us). 

“Pardon?”

We thought this one was the POLITE version but apparently, this is another big no. The preferred word is “sorry?” or “sorry, what?”

“Couch”

There are only “sofas” in Buckingham palace, dear. 

What’s for “dessert”? 

This one physically hurts. If you can’t ASK for dessert then how can you HAVE dessert? 

The proper term to use is “pudding”. While pudding is great and all, we hope they get more than just hot globby sugar for dessert. Hot globby pudding doesn’t help after a stressful day - you need chocolate cake, thank you very much. 

What “perfume” do you wear?

Swap for: “scent”, ie: “What is the scent you’re wearing?” 

What time is “tea?”

We thought tea was the poshest word of all posh words, but apparently, we’re wrong. The preferred word for “tea” is “supper”. 

“Dinner” isn’t off limits, but it’s generally only used in reference to large formal occasions that involve heads of state or visiting monarchs. 

Guess our family dinner doesn’t qualify then? 

“Posh”

Oh, the irony. 

Being a royal is hard work. 

Images: Getty, Giphy / Giphy.

ENOUGH WORDS! RELAX YOUR EYEBALLS WITH THIS VIDEO:

Ahead of his wedding, Fitzy and Wippa roasted Matt de Groot and brought in a special kissable COUSIN he'd rather forget...

Written By Krisinda Merhi